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WIKWEMIKONG TOURISM: COVID-19 VISITOR GUIDE

Wikwemikong Tourism has created a visitor guide for travellers to Manitoulin Island and Killarney in Ontario with attractions and services open for the 2020 season.

Wikwemikong Tourism has been taking proactive measures throughout this pandemic to protect its citizens and most vulnerable community members. This exemplary guide includes visitor protocol as well as a suggested Covid-19 traveller kit that works to ensure the health and safety of the community and travellers while promoting businesses that are in operation during this time.

LEARN MORE
TRANS CANADA TRAIL’S CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 
The Trans-Canada Trail has announced The Great Trail Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for 2020-2021 is open for submissions. TCT will accept applications on an ongoing basis throughout the year. No deadlines are in place.

With such a long and vast Trail, there will always be opportunities for continued improvement and enhancements. That’s where CIP comes in! The CIP is run by Trans Canada Trail (TCT) and provides financial contributions to projects on The Great Trail of Canada.

Please consult the 
CIP Guidelines to learn about project eligibility and TCT’s priorities. If you are interested in applying, please contact project@tctrail.ca to start the process.
MANDATORY RECORD KEEPING REQUIREMENTS
As of August 7th, 2020, all restaurant, bars, boat tours and guiding services will be required to keep client logs for a period of 30 days and disclose the client logs to the medical officer of health or an inspector under the Health Protection and Promotion Act upon request, which will help support case and contact tracing.

These changes have been initiated through amendments to orders 
O. Reg 364/20: Rules for Areas in Stage 3 and O. Reg. 263/20: Rules for Areas in Stage 2, under the Reopening Ontario (A Flexible Response to COVID-19) Act, 2020.

Under these acts, the following is listed for food and drink establishments (which includes restaurant, bars and dining halls):
The person responsible for the establishment must,
  • i. record the name and contact information of every patron who enters an indoor or outdoor dining area in the establishment, other than patrons who temporarily enter the area to place, pick up or pay for a takeout order,
  • ii. maintain the records for a period of at least one month, and
  • iii. only disclose the records to a medical officer of health or an inspector under the Health Protection and Promotion Act on request for a purpose specified in section 2 of that Act or as otherwise required by law.
Under these acts, the following is listed for tour and guide services:
(1) Tour and guide services, including guided fishing and hunting trips, tastings and tours for wineries, breweries and distilleries, trail riding tours, walking tours, bicycle tours and motor vehicle tours.

The tour or guide service must,
  • i. record the name and contact information of every patron,
  • ii. maintain the records for a period of at least one month, and
  • iii. only disclose the records to a medical officer of health or an inspector under the Health Protection and Promotion Act on request for a purpose specified in section 2 of that Act or as otherwise required by law.
Thanks to Nature & Outdoor Tourism Ontario (NOTO) for sharing this reminder. For more information and resources for tourism operators, visit NOTO’s website.  
ITAC STIMULUS FUND UPDATE

Did you miss the webinar last week about the ITAC Stimulus Grant update?

The webinar was presented for ITAC members, Indigenous tourism businesses, Indigenous communities or any tourism partner wanting to better understand the exact status of ITAC’s Stimulus Development Grants. The presentation shed some light on the process in which ITAC is engaged to receive and redistribute funds committed by the federal government. No firm date or timeline was given as to when the next round of successful applicants would be announced or when funds would start flowing. It was confirmed that there will be another application period for businesses that have not yet applied. 

ITAC’s President & CEO Keith Henry was joined by John Giraldez from Indigenous Services Canada and David Acco from Acosys Consulting Services. The discussion also includes the latest from ITAC’s “Escape from Home” campaign and information on the Indigenous Business Taskforce, which outlines how to be listed on the federal government’s supplier directory.

WATCH WEBINAR RECORDING
THE STATE OF WOMEN’S ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN CANADA

New report from the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub shows women entrepreneurs face structural inequalities which are exacerbated by COVID-19.

The State of Women’s Entrepreneurship in Canada 2020, the first annual report from the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub (WEKH), synthesizes government, academic, and expert research to highlight some of the structural barriers facing diverse women entrepreneurs in Canada. The research shows clearly that COVID-19 has amplified structural barriers, has affected women entrepreneurs more than men and has affected Indigenous, racialized and other diverse entrepreneurs most of all.

While the study showed that more data are needed on diverse women entrepreneurs, it highlighted some important issues:

  • Women are majority owners of about 15.6 percent of Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs) with one or more employees – about 114,000 companies (2017). But women account for over 37 percent of self-employed Canadians or 1,050,000 (2019).  
  • Women entrepreneurs are more likely to be in services, social, health and beauty, and food sectors than in manufacturing and technology. 
  • Women are less likely to seek and receive financing than men (32.6 percent vs. 38 percent) and firms owned by men are more likely to receive venture capital or angel funding and other forms of leverage such as trade credit or capital leasing.  
  • SMEs with under 20 employees have been the hardest hit during the pandemic and women are more likely to own newer and smaller businesses, making them the most affected. 
  • During the pandemic, the percentage of women-owned businesses that laid off staff, 40.6 percent, is about equal to the percentage of men-owned businesses overall (40.5 percent). However, the percentage of women-owned businesses that have laid off 80 percent or more of their employees is substantially greater than that of businesses overall (62.1 percent vs. 45.2 percent).
READ THE FULL REPORT
       

      Indigenous Tourism Ontario
      1300 Hwy 540
      4 directions Complex Unit 4
      Aundeck Omni Kaning, Ontario
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